Donate your leftover currency: Over £100,000 raised in 2020

Donate your leftover currency: Over £100,000 raised in 2020

Despite the economic slump caused by Covid-19, we have exchanged over £100,000 pounds for charities so far in 2020. That is an amazing amount, topping all previous years!

This means a lot for the charities we work with and they are super grateful for the generous donations made by so many people who chose to give away the value of their leftover travel money to raise funds for good causes. A big Thank You to everyone who donated!

1000 lira coin – Turkey’s high denomination inflation coins

1000 lira coin – Turkey’s high denomination inflation coins

As we will explain further below, Turkey was going through a period of hyperinflation in the 1990’s and 2000’s. As a result, the value of the Turkish Lira dropped and the country was forced to mint coins in ever greater denominations.

To avoid having too many zeroes on the coins, the Turkish government decided to use the word ‘One Thousand’ instead, which in Turkish is ‘Bin’. From 1994 until 2004, coins were minted in denominations of 10 bin lira (10,000), 25 bin lira (25,000), 50 bin lira (50,000), 100 bin lira (100,000) and 250 bin lira (250,000).

Can old currency be exchanged now?

Can old currency be exchanged now?

Currency for which the exchange deadline has expired no longer has a monetary value. So-called ‘demonetised‘ banknotes and coins have no value except for the raw materials they are made off, and a possible collector value to . A banknote or coin’s collector value is determined by its condition, rarity and popularity among collectors.

At Leftover Currency we continue to exchange a number of currencies for which the exchange deadline has expired. Although we pay less than the old face value, we are still able to pay a fair amount for old demonetised currencies such as the Cypriot Pound, French Franc, Italian Lira, Greek Drachma or Maltese Pound.

Will more countries join the Eurozone?

Will more countries join the Eurozone?

Eight countries are part of the European Union but are not part of the Euro area: Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Denmark. Hungary, Poland, Romania and Sweden. Denmark has negotiated an opt-out from the Euro. The other countries have committed to joining the euro area as and when they meet the conditions for entry to the euro area.

One of the entry conditions for a country to join the euro area is to participate in the second version of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM-II) for two years before joining the Euro. This requires the country to pass the ERM-II legislation. As a result, countries can decide not to approve ERM-II laws and thereby not meet the entry conditions for the euro area.

There is no deadline for the remaining EU countries to join the euro area. Some countries, such as Poland and the Czech Republic, have made it clear that they don’t plan to join anytime soon. Other countries, including Bulgaria, Croatia and Romania, are expected to join the Eurozone in the near future. We look at this in more detail in what follows.

I have Peruvian Intis. What’s their value?

I have Peruvian Intis. What’s their value?

Peruvian Intis were the currency of Peru between 1985 and 1991. The Inti was named after the Incan sun god and was introduced in 1985, replacing the Sol (sun) at a rate of 1000 soles to 1 inti.

The Sol had lost a lot of value because of high inflation in Peru. By dropping three zeroes and renaming the national currency, the Peruvian government hoped to normalise the monetary situation.

In 1985, the Banco Central de Reserva del Perú  introduced banknotes in denominations of 10, 50, 100 and 500 intis. Peruvian coins in 1985 were 0.01, 0.05, 0.10, 0.20, 0.50, 1 and 5 intis. Peru’s new government led by Alan García saw good results at first, but it wasn’t long until inflation would come back with a vengeance.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) update Leftover Currency

Coronavirus (COVID-19) update Leftover Currency

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak is ongoing in the United Kingdom. The British government has taken measures to contain and delay the spread of the infectious disease. Businesses in the UK remain open and staff members continue to attend work as normal. People with symptoms are asked to self-isolate. Where possible, staff members are encouraged to work from home.

Foreign Coin Exchange FAQs

Foreign Coin Exchange FAQs

Leftover Currency converts foreign coins, old banknotes and obsolete currencies to cash, quickly and easily.

Leftover Currency,
Unit 1 Portland Business Centre,
Manor House Lane,
Datchet SL3 9EG,
United Kingdom

Legal tender coins explained

Legal tender coins explained

The rules around the legal tender status of coins in the UK are set out in the Coinage Act 1971 and the Currency Act 1983. In England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, all coins minted by the Royal Mint and authorised by Royal Proclamation are legal tender.

The following coins are legal tender in the UK:

Currency Converters – Do they add up?

Currency Converters – Do they add up?

When choosing a currency calculator, make sure that the purpose of your query fits the purpose of the calculator. If you want to know a mid-market exchange rate, don’t use a currency calculator on a travel money website or one on a money transfer website.

Ask yourself what you want to use the currency converter for. If you want to trade currency on the foreign exchange market, you’ll need to consider using a paid-for currency rates service with real-time information without delays.

Money Quiz Questions

Money Quiz Questions

At the time of writing, in 2020, there are nineteen countries in the Eurozone:

Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.

What is the value of a 100,000 Republika Hrvatska banknote?

What is the value of a 100,000 Republika Hrvatska banknote?

Does that mean you can exchange these 50,000 and 100,000 Croatian Dinara banknotes for these amounts? Again, unfortunately not. The exchange deadline for Hrvatskih Dinara banknotes expired shortly after they were replaced by the Kuna banknotes. Croatian Dinara banknotes have no more monetary value and should be considered as collectable items, or so called ‘numismatic pieces’. So are the 50,000 and 100,000 dinara banknotes maybe rare collector items with a high collector’s value? Again, no.

In 1996, the Croatian National Bank flooded the collector market with 600,000 sets of invalid dinar banknotes in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 25, 100, 500, 1,000, 2,000, 5,000, 10,000, 50,000 and 100,000 Croatian Dinar series, in uncirculated mint condition in the original packaging of cash receivers. 

According to the numismatic catalog ‘Coins and banknotes from Yugoslavia, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro and Macedonia‘ by Zlatko Viščević, the collector’s value, or ‘catalog value’ of the two highest denomination Croatian Dinara banknotes is the following: 

Crooked sixpence love tokens

Crooked sixpence love tokens

As described by ex-metal detectorist John Winter, sixpence love tokens were common in the 19th century. A man would give his sweetheart the crooked coin, no longer spendable: It would be a statement to deliberately mess up hard earned money, and to give it away as a token of love.

Some sixpence love tokens would have initials or heart symbols engraved on them. They were popular on the Feast of Saint Valentine. The lady who received the coin could either keep the love token when the love was reciprocal. Or she could throw the coin away. Metal detectorists find many crooked sixpences at the site of old fairs…